OP Annual Report 2017: High Tech High Touch

High Tech, High Touch Fiscal Year 2017 Annual Report

Mission Operation Pathways provides and coordinates place-based programs and services for residents in affordable housing communities to increase quality of life. Vision Vibrant housing communities where residents are engaged, empowered, and supported to live to their fullest potential.

High Tech, High Touch

We’ve all heard the expression “high tech, high touch” which simply means that people should find a balance between high tech skills and high touch skills of life, the former focusing on allowing new tech advances to help and enhance our daily lives and the latter being activities that keep us healthy, creative, and energized.

This year, Operation Pathways Inc., NHPF’s affiliate, has embraced a “high tech, high touch” philosophy in providing and coordinating “wraparound” services aimed at our senior population. Via this winning combination of “high tech and high touch,” Operation Pathways has brought significant changes and positive outcomes to seniors at our properties, including successful senior isolation interventions and improved quality of life.

On the “high tech” side, examples include Operation Pathway’s AARP Foundation pilot program offered in Baltimore and southeast Washington, DC providing seniors with Amazon Echo devices, which have helped enhance their daily lives and their sense of security. Since early 2017, close to 50 residents have received Amazon Echo devices. Supporting “aging in place” by enhancing our personal, attentive care (“high touch”) with the latest technology continues to prove a winning combination for our residents. We encourage you to read more about our efforts in the following annual report.

Richard F. Burns President, Operation Pathways, Inc.

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 1

Letter from the Executive Director

“Too many people, when they get old, think that they have to live by the calendar.” —John Glenn (1921–2016)

At age 77, John Glenn became the oldest person to board a space shuttle and go into space. He was led by the notion that his chronological age was simply a measurement on a calendar and should not be viewed by its limitations. John Glenn understood that his age did not restrict his activities; it actually prepared him for them. This is a message that we share with all of the older adults living in the housing communities served by Operation Pathways. Operation Pathways had another great year providing and

coordinating programs and services for residents living in affordable housing communities aimed at increasing quality of life. While Operation Pathways serves all individuals and families across our portfolio of properties, we focus our attention on our older adult residents in this report, with special attention to seniors and technology. In Falls Church, VA residents take advantage of workshops to better understand how to use smart phones and tablets. Many of our older residents are realizing that understanding these technologies increases their opportunities to communicate with their children and grandchildren. We were astounded by the response to offering these workshops. We found that many of our residents actually owned smart phones that they seldom (and in a few cases never) used. Most knew how to make a phone call, but didn’t utilize any of its other functions. In Waterbury, Connecticut, our partner service providers from Beacon Communities offer our residents Connected Living. This senior-friendly computer program allows our residents to stay connected to one another as well as to the office staff. Residents stay engaged in community events and programs by logging into their Connected Living account. Connected Living also provides residents with easy access to the internet and social media with its senior-friendly interface. In Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD, older adults are using Amazon Echo devices provided through a grant by the AARP Foundation. Residents use their Amazon Echo devices to engage with one another, the office staff, and the internet. This technology can be used as a tool to decrease social isolation among older adults by keeping them engaged with the outside world. Residents are also given the option to use “smart sockets” with their Amazon Echo devices to turn lamps on and off just by asking Alexa to do it for them. No more falls between the bed and the light switch in the middle of the night! As John Glenn taught us, technological advances are not only to be utilized by the young. The seniors in our housing communities are turning to assistive-technology to increase their quality of life, and Operation Pathways is proud to help them make these connections. We thank all of our supporters and partners that help make this possible. Kenneth D. White Executive Director, Operation Pathways, Inc.

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Operation Pathways: 2017 By the Numbers

Through our resident services coordinators, we are able to collect and analyze valuable data that is critical to our work and to the work of affordable housing advocates across the nation.

606 PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

97% OF NHPF PROPERTIES HAVE COMMUNITY CENTERS ON-SITE

1,297 ADULTS RECEIVED EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE

3,997 RESIDENTS PARTICIPATED IN FINANCIAL PROGRAMS & SERVICES

754 RESIDENTS RECEIVED COMPUTER ACCESS/TRAINING

17 YOUNG ADULTS COMPLETED THE PATHWAY TO WORK SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

11,837 RESIDENTS IN OUR COMMUNITIES

100% OF NHPF PROPERTIES ARE WITHIN 3 MILES OF A MEDICAL CENTER

32 AVERAGE AGE OF A RESIDENT

25 PROGRAM SITES

4,693 COMMUNITY EVENTS WERE ORGANIZED

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 3

Pathway to Aging in Place: High Tech

Smartphone and Tablet “101” When 75 year old Harold Baines was 11 years old, the transistor radio was invented. He remembers listening to baseball games with his friends while walking around the old neighborhood. When Mr. Baines was 37 years old, he traded in his transistor radio for a Sony Walkman® with a cassette player. It was about that same time that he heard of people having computers in their homes, but certainly not anybody he knew. In his early fifties, some of his friends and family members were starting to get home computers, but Mr. Baines didn’t see the need for such luxuries, and he didn’t know how they could improve his life. Mr. Baines continued working and providing for his wife after their two children moved away with families of their own. Mr. Baines retired at 72 years old and lost his wife that same year. He now lives alone in an NHP Foundation service-enriched, affordable housing community. Mr. Baines was delighted last Christmas when his daughter and his two grandchildren came to visit. As

a gift, Mr. Baines’ daughter gave him a smartphone and the grandchildren tried to teach him how to use it. However, once they left to return home, he put the phone in a drawer and eventually forgot how to turn it on. One day while walking through the lobby in his apartment building, Mr. Baines spotted a flyer that read, “Learn How To Use a Smartphone and Tablet.” The resident services coordinator had located a partner organization that would assist seniors in using smartphone technology. A week later, Mr. Baines dug his phone out of the drawer and showed up for class. In his very first session, he sent a text message to his granddaughter telling her that he was looking forward to seeing her on FaceTime, which he would learn about the following week. Since then, Mr. Baines has been keeping in touch with his family weekly by calls, texts, and FaceTime using his smartphone.

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AARP Echo Program With support from the AARP Foundation and Amazon, the Amazon Echo Program began in 2017 at three of NHPF’s senior properties. Through this partnership, Operation Pathways has made significant strides in offering senior residents technology services that allow them to stay connected to the world, producing positive outcomes, including health, well-being, and a greater sense of community. AARP granted funding to purchase Amazon Echo devices for residents who were interested in participating in this study. To receive an Amazon Echo device, residents would need to participate in surveys and focus groups to offer feedback about the ways in which they used the Amazon Echo devices and how they felt the technology has helped them to make and maintain social connections. Irene Hawker saw this as an exciting opportunity. Ms. Hawker had just returned home from a rehabilitation facility following a fall two months prior while out grocery shopping. She was recovering well, but now relied on a walker to help her with balance when walking around her apartment. Over the years, the resident services coordinator had seen many seniors like Ms. Hawker become depressed and less social as they lost mobility. Irene Hawker was certainly a perfect candidate to receive an Amazon Echo device to keep her engaged. After receiving her Amazon Echo device and initial training, Ms. Hawker was ready to try it out. All she had to do was remember to say “Alexa” first and then make her request. She asked Alexa to play songs that were popular in 1949, back when she was 15 years old. Hearing the songs of her youth brought back so many wonderful memories and stories of her past. She couldn’t wait to share these newly remembered stories with her friends when they played cards later in the week. She also used the Amazon Echo device to remind her to take her medication.

Twice every day Alexa says, “Irene, this is a reminder to take your medication.” And Irene dutifully does just that. In the next Amazon Echo device training session, Ms. Hawker learned that her Amazon Echo device could speak to other Amazon Echo devices in their housing community. When she returned to her apartment, she noticed that her Amazon Echo device had a yellow ring around the top, which she learned meant she had a message waiting for her. She asked Alexa to play her messages, and she then heard the voice of her resident services coordinator telling her that there would be an ice cream social in the community room in her building that evening after dinner. Irene Hawker had fun that night at the social and then returned to her apartment to get ready for bed. As she got into bed that night, she said, “Alexa . . . goodnight.” Alexa responded, “Goodnight Irene.”

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 5

Pathway to Academic Achievement

In 2017, Operation Pathways delivered 9,602 hours of programs and services to our residents, touching the lives of 4,851 individuals. Operation Pathways was proud to collaborate with over 600 partner organizations, a dramatic increase from 115 partner organizations in 2015. Throughout the year, our resident services coordinators organized 4,693 events dedicated to the Operation Pathways mission of improving residents’ quality of life through the four pathways: Academic Achievement, Healthier Living, Financial Stability, and Aging in Place.

Pathway to Academic Achievement focuses on the educational needs of residents, promoting academic success and lifelong learning as a means to break the cycle of poverty. Afterschool Programs In 2017, Operation Pathways afterschool programs flourished. In addition to providing direct-service programming, Operation Pathways also partnered with organizations that design and implement programs for school-age children during the hours after school. The afterschool programs included four primary components: Home-School Connection, Homework Habits, Project-Based Learning, and One- on-One/Small Group Tutoring to improve in-school achievement, each producing measurable results and increasing academic success. In 2017 • 73% of children enrolled in Operation Pathways’ afterschool programs improved their reading performance by at least one grade level • 70% of children enrolled in Operation Pathways’ afterschool programs improved their math performance by at least one grade level

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Latisha’s Story: Advocacy And Autism Three years ago, Latisha had trouble raising her son Jamal, who is autistic and prone to aggressive behavior and angry outbursts. Pam, the resident services coordinator at Ships’ Cove in Fall River, Massachusetts, was able to arrange a meeting with a child psychiatrist. Pam also made an appointment at the local parent advocacy center for autism, which provided further assistance for Latisha. Jamal completed a hospital stay and upon his return, despite occasional challenges, he was no longer having meltdowns. Jamal continues to receive psychiatric services at UMass Medical in Worcester and the family is seeing wonderful results, with social and academic skills improving greatly. An in-home therapy service, Can Do Agency, has also helped the entire family learn better strategies to support Jamal.

Summer Camp Programs The summer camp programs include both academic and healthy lifestyle components. Here, children keep their minds and bodies active, decreasing and even eliminating the possibility of summer learning loss, while staying physically fit. From pre-test to post-test, according to the Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills, the goal of Operation Pathways is that children will show no signs of summer learning loss in math and reading. In 2017 •  96% of children participating in Operation Pathways’ summer camps showed no signs of summer learning loss in math •  97% of participating children in Operation Pathways’ summer camps showed no signs of summer learning loss in reading

Where you live matters.

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 7

Pathway to Healthier Living

Pathway to Healthier Living promotes activities and lifestyles that lead to physical, psychological, and emotional well-being for individuals and communities.

The Pathway to Healthier Living is specifically designed as a resident services program focused on the health needs of individuals from low- income households, and it focuses on limiting the adverse impact of chronic diseases and maximizing opportunities for success. In 2017 • 1,242 individuals enrolled in Operation Pathways health and wellness programs • 1,290 individuals received free, nutritious meals •  447 individuals participated in a physical fitness program • 1,328 individuals increased fruit and vegetable intake • 871 individuals increased their physical activity

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Khamari’s Story: Garden Captain

At Forest Park in New Orleans, Louisiana, the community global garden has done much more than bring fresh produce and herbs to families. For Khamari, who is in the 4th grade, it has become a positive outlet, leadership opportunity, and it has transformed reading into a fun activity. Khamari has struggled with reading in school and with controlling his emotions in a group setting. Over the last year, helping in the garden has become one of Khamari’s favorite things to do, and his behavior has greatly improved as a result. Due to his leadership and positive behavior, Khamari was recently awarded “Youth Garden Captain” status. Khamari practices his reading skills by reading the back of the seed packs to make sure that the seeds are planted correctly. He also enjoys reading all of the garden signs to the younger kids so they know what each plant is. When asked what he wants to be when he grows up, he responded, “if I don’t make it to the NBA, I would like to be a farmer so I can grow food for my family and give some away to people who are hungry.”

Community Gardens In place at a number of NHPF community centers, gardening projects combine activity with instruction, producing organic, healthy fruits and vegetables. At Forest Park in New Orleans, LA, a 1,000 square- foot community global garden was designed and built, funded by the Whole Kid Foundation Grant and the Tulane University Center for Public Service Fellowship. The community garden has thrived, and residents are able to take home fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs. The garden has also been used for culinary activities in afterschool programs, adult wellness socials, and “family fun” garden planting events. Each Wednesday during the afterschool program, children are able to help in the garden. Three “garden captains” maintain the garden, and residents volunteer to assist daily.

Where you live matters.

FISCAL YEAR 2016 ANNUAL REPORT 9

Pathway to Financial Stability

Pathway to Financial Stability educates participants in sound financial practices to increase income, decrease expenses, and build assets.

Operation Pathways is a national partner with America Saves Week, a program that stresses the importance of paying oneself first. Additionally, Operation Pathways partners with local financial institutions to provide financial literacy instruction and expertise for our participants. Residents in this program are coached by staff and volunteers who help guide them through lessons. With this education, residents are able to build budgets and begin saving for their futures. In 2017, the amount of money saved during ASW nearly tripled since 2015. In 2017 •  562 individuals participated in America Saves Week •  America Saves Week participants saved over $20,000 in total (at least 3 months after making the pledge to save) • 3,997 individuals participated in financial programs and services • 1,297 individuals participated in workforce development programming •  288 individuals received eviction prevention assistance •  1,263 individuals received housing and home ownership assistance

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Tax Return Assistance Operation Pathways provides tax return assistance to residents through MyFreeTaxes.com, a program provided free of charge to persons earning less than $64,000 a year. Since 2004, Operation Pathways has led a community-based Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program called Buck$Back at Foxwood Manor in Levittown, PA. Each year, volunteers help hundreds of taxpayers improve their financial situation. Tax preparation volunteers receive online and classroom training to prepare a limited scope of tax returns. Since its beginning in 2004, Buck$Back volunteers at Foxwood Manor in Levittown, Pennsylvania have produced measurable results. In 2017 • Over 450 tax returns were completed at Foxwood Manor, generating over $620,000 in federal refunds and over $25,000 in state refunds.

Randy’s Story: Cigarettes to Savings Randy is a resident of Alexander House in Hagerstown, Maryland and participated in their first smoking cessation class in October 2016. The program was brought to Alexander House by Sandy Berry, the resident services coordinator, and was sponsored by the Washington County Health Department. Randy attended each session and completed the 8-week program successfully. He has been a non-smoker ever since. Shortly after completing the program, Randy participated in the America Saves Week program. Operation Pathways’ sites participate in American Saves Week every year. Residents are encouraged to make pledges to open savings accounts and make saving a habit. Randy opened a savings account with $25 and made a pledge to save the money that he had been spending on cigarettes. Recently, at an Alexander House community council meeting, Randy informed Sandy that he has $1,400 in his savings account and he continues to have automatic “cigarette payments” deposited from his paycheck.

Teen Internship Program In the Pathway to Work Summer Internship Program, teen interns are employed by the

property management companies contracted at the properties where they work, and report directly to the resident services coordinators assigned to the same. Operation Pathways lays a solid foundation in the lives of teens who participate in the program. The interns’ coursework enables them to fulfill the program’s two primary goals: preparing them for the world of work and teaching financial responsibility. In 2017 •  93% of teen internship participants opened their first bank account •  93% of teen internship participants met their savings goals

Where you live matters.

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 11

Pathway to Aging in Place

All human beings need social connections to stay healthy and thrive. This is especially true for older adults who live independently.

Social Connectedness Several factors cause family members and friends to separate and many times older adults find themselves isolated from the people who once were close to them. Scarce resources only exacerbate this problem for seniors living in affordable housing. Social isolation and loneliness have a negative impact on mental health, and are linked to negative physical health factors, such as higher blood pressure, heart disease, early onset of dementia, and increased susceptibility to influenza and other infectious diseases. Pathway to Aging in Place engages residents in NHPF’s senior communities by providing programs and services that connect senior residents to others as well as to the tools they need to ensure economic

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Gertrude’s Story: Aging Gracefully

Gertrude, a resident in one of our senior properties, told Linnea, the resident services coordinator at Mark Twain in Chicago, that she needed help getting her identification back, as she had lost her wallet. Linnea helped Gertrude understand what documentation she needed to bring to the DMV and advocated on her behalf when her bank failed to provide her the proper document she needed. Unfortunately, when Gertrude went to the DMV, all documentation in hand, she was still rejected since she had lost her green card as well and was not able to prove residency. Gertrude felt like giving up but, thankfully, Linnea referred her to legal aid, who helped her fill out an application for a duplicate green card, and apply for financial assistance for the application fee. As she aged, Gertrude had a difficult time keeping track of paperwork and traveling to appointments by herself. Linnea identified a service to assist Gertrude with transportation. Gertrude told resident services that a huge weight had been lifted off of her, as she no longer had to face problems all alone and was grateful for the assistance.

security, prevent illness, improve health, understand their legal rights, and live in a safe environment while also providing the education and technology to improve overall life satisfaction. Seniors are engaged through one-on-one, small-group, and large-group activities that also encourage socialization. Operation Pathways continues to expand its Aging in Place programs and has steadily increased the number of retired individuals served each year. In 2017, Operation Pathways served nearly 50% more retired individuals than in 2015.

Where you live matters.

FISCAL YEAR 2017 ANNUAL REPORT 13

Financial Partners

DEL VALLEY MENTAL HEALTH DEUTSCH-KHANNA FAMILY FUND DOLLAR GENERAL LITERACY FOUNDATION DONALD & NANCY HESS EDGEWOOD MANAGEMENT COMPANY EILEEN FISHER ELIZABETH ORTMANN EMERGENCY FOOD & SHELTER PROGRAM, CT GREATER NEW ORLEANS FOUNDATION ERYKA LINDSEY ESSEX COUNTY, NJ EVELYNN HOWELL EVERY KID A KING FOUNDATION EXXON MOBIL FIRST BOOK PHILADELPHIA FOOD BANK OF SOUTH EAST JERSEY FOUNDATION COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP FOX POOL MANAGEMENT FRANK CERBINI FRANK L SULLIVAN, JR. FRED MITCHELL

AGM FINANCIAL SERVICES AHC INC. AL BROWNE AMANDA WALZ AMANDA YU AMAZON FOUNDATION AMAZON SMILE AMERIGROUP CORPORATION AMERIGROUP FOUNDATION

ANDREA QUIMOYOG ANDREW PAGTAKHAN ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ASSETS FOR INDEPENDENCE IDA (HHS) AT&T FOUNDATION AVANI PATEL AZAR FOUNDATION BANCORPSOUTH

BELLWETHER ENTERPRISE BBV COMPASS FOUNDATION BERK FOUNDATION BEST BUY CHILDREN’S FOUNDATION BEVERLY JOHNSON BOCARSLY EMDEN COWAN ESMALL & ARNDT LLP BOTTOM DOLLAR FOOD STORE BUCKS COUNTY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION BUCKS COUNTY FOOD BANK BUCKS COUNTY OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL CALECO CAPITAL ONE CARLOS GONZALES CAROL-ANN MASON CAROLYN HARDAWAY CARRIE YEAGER CENTER FOR HEALTH CHARLENE BRISCO CHERIE SANTOS-WUEST CHILDREN AND FAMILY LEGACY FUND CITIGROUP FOUNDATION CITY OF FALLS CHURCH COMMUNITY SERVICE FUND CITY OF ORANGE, NJ

FREDDIE MAC CORPORATION FREDDIE MAC FOUNDATION FRIENDS OF TINA DAVIS

GARY PARKINSON GPOA FOUNDATION GULF YOUTH ACTION CORPS/AMERICORPS HALLKEEN HAMEL BUILDERS, INC. HEALTHY CITY FALL RIVER

HERON FOUNDATION HEWLETT PACKARD

HILLCREST FOUNDATION HOME DEPOT FOUNDATION HOMEFREE-USA DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT HUEY AND ANGELINA WILSON FOUNDATION IAN SOBEL INSPIRE CREDIT UNION JAMES A. JOSEPH

JAMIE SMARR JAY LEGASPI JENNIFER JU JESSIE PAGTAKHAN MARY AND JOE WIEDORFER JOHN HOFFER JOHN MICHAEL FEEHAN

CLARITA RAMOS CLAUDE CHOW CMQ FLOORING COLUMBIA BAPTIST CHURCH COREY JOHN DARIEN COMMUNITY FUND DAWN GUTIERREZ

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RICHARD BURNS ROBERT ABRAMS RON TIENZO SAM WILDHALM SAM’S CLUB SANTOS WUEST SBC SCOTT BARKAN SHARE OUR STRENGTH SHARPS LANDSCAPING, INC SHAY DUGAN SHEHZ ENT. INC (SUBWAY) SODEXO REMOTE SITES SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

JOHN ORTMANN JORDAN JOHNSON JOSEFINA BARREDO JOSEPH SPERLAZZO JOYCE MOSKOVITZ JOYCE WALZ JUNIOR LEAGUE OF BATON ROUGE KEITH & SUSAN ORGERON KELLIHER SALZER KEN WHITE KENDRA STENSVEN & JEFF MACDONAGH KEVIN LEWIS KISS ELECTRIC, L.L.C. KLEIN HORNIG LLP LATTER & BLUM LISA HOUNSHELL

SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY SUB CONTRACT CDBG ST. JOHN’S COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, INC. STATE FARM STEPHEN GREEN SUNTRUST UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN ETHEL AND T. PEYTON ROBINSON TANNER FINNAN THE DAVID AND MINNIE BERK FOUNDATION THE FROST FOUNDATION

LIVI CENTENO-MCNULLA LOUISIANA PIZZA KITCHEN MANSUR ABDUL-MALIK MARY GOCHUICO MASS MUTUAL

MEADE RHODES MECKY ADNANI METLIFE FOUNDATION MICHAEL FRANKLIN NAHMA EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION NEAL DROBENARE NEW JERSEY SHARES NIAGARA CARES/NIAGARA BOTTLING NO CHILD HUNGRY OLDWAYS TASTE OF AFRICAN HERITAGE PAMELA ANDERSON-LIVINGSTON PAMELA ROBINSON PATRICIA DIAZ DENNIS PATRICK FRY PAULINE BACULI PENNSYLVANIA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY PEOPLE’S UNITED COMMUNITY FOUNDATION PHILABUNDANCE PHILIP LANDICHO PNC FOUNDATION PRESERVING LOUISIANA’S AFFORDABLE HOUSING PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY RALPH BOYD RAMON AGGABAO REGINELLIS PIZZERIA RENEW OUR MUSIC FUND, INC.

THE LITTLE FUND THAT COULD THE MEADOWS FOUNDATION THE SIRUS FUND THE WACHOVIA FOUNDATION

THOMAS VACCARO TIFFANY MARTINEZ TIM PRYOR

LESLIE AND TOM CARR TOMLINSON FOR SENATE TULANE UNIVERSITY UNITED WAY OF HOUSTON

UNITED WAY OF METRO DALLAS UNITED WAY OF WESTERN CT US BANK WAL-MART WASHINGTON GAS AND LIGHT WEGMANS WHOLE KIDS FOUNDATION WILLIAM PENN BANK FOUNDATION WILSON FOUNDATION WINNRESIDENTIAL

NEW YORK HEADQUARTERS 122 EAST 42ND STREET, SUITE 4900 NEW YORK, NY 10168 • 646.336.4940 WASHINGTON, DC 1090 VERMONT AVENUE, NW, SUITE 400 WASHINGTON, DC 20005 • 202.789.5300 CHICAGO 150 N. MICHIGAN AVENUE, SUITE 2800 CHICAGO, IL 60601 • 312.216.5103 www.operationpathways.org

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