NHPF-Authored Articles & Industry Reports

Do Educators Feel Prepared and Able to Support Students? “ You’re allowed to fail, you just can’t quit. ”  —MARY BADILLO,

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ER MEDICINE, MONTEFIORE MEDICAL CENTER, GROWING UP & OUT OF POVERTY: WHY HOUSING MATTERS SYMPOSIUM, OCTOBER 14, 2020

Many do not know how to play a role in supporting students In addition to understanding the perceived impact of housing related challenges, NHPF and Enterprise also wanted to find out if educators feel prepared and able to identify and support students. We found that 85 percent of surveyed educators said they would be able to identify a student experiencing a housing-related challenge. However, more than a third (38%) also indicated they do not know how to connect students to supportive services (See Figure 11). In schools with a higher share of students from low income households, fewer educators reported feeling confident to connect students to available supports. In Title 1 schools, only 58 percent of respondents indicated they would know how to connect a student with supportive services, compared to 66 percent in non-Title 1 schools.

Percent of educators surveyed

FIGURE 11: Knows how to connect students to available support services

Title 1 Status

Total

Title 1

Non-Title 1

Knows how to connect students (net)

62%

58%

66%

Does not know how to connect students (net)

38%

42%

34%

More than 1 in 4 (27%) of urban educators indicated they “definitely” would be able to identify a student experiencing housing-related challenges, compared with just 9 percent of suburban and 12 percent of rural educators. Three quarters (75%) of urban educators indicated that they would typically learn a student is experiencing housing-related challenges from the student themselves. Many have not been trained to support students Our survey asked about how schools are assisting educators to identify and support students, through training and other resources. Almost half (44%) of the educators surveyed indicated they had no training in identifying or supporting students experiencing housing- related challenges (see Figure 12), however trainings were more common in urban schools. More than half of urban educators (55%) attended a training facilitated by their school or district, compared with 36 percent of suburban educators and 38 percent of rural staff. Full- service community school staff indicated their school provided training more frequently (62% compared to 50% overall).

Growing Up & Out of Poverty

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